Louise Morse

Louise Morse Blog

Updates, comment and stories by Louise Morse

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Families, fun, affirming faith and prompting ‘re-menting’ this Christmas

Many things make Christmas special, but one thing can make it even better for people living with dementia or mild cognitive impairment. Our new Brain & Soul Boosting for Seniors’ Christmas special can help strengthen mental processes (cognition) and bring contentment that creates perfect conditions for ‘re-menting’ – that stepping through the fog momentarily as wholly themselves.

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Families, fun, affirming faith and prompting ‘re-menting’ this Christmas

Many things make Christmas special, but one thing can make it even better for people living with dementia or mild cognitive impairment. Our new Brain & Soul Boosting for Seniors’ Christmas special can help strengthen mental processes (cognition) and bring contentment that creates perfect conditions for ‘re-menting’ – that stepping through the fog momentarily as wholly themselves.

Read More »
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Ageism affecting older people.
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Families, fun, affirming faith and prompting 're-menting' this Christmas
Many things make Christmas special, but one thing can make it even better for people living with dementia or mild cognitive impairment. Our new Brain & Soul Boosting for Seniors' Christmas special can help strengthen mental processes (cognition) and bring contentment that creates perfect conditions for 're-menting' - that stepping through the fog momentarily as wholly themselves.
Think yourself younger!
When the Queen turned down an award for 'oldie of the year' she said we are as young as we feel, and therefore she didn't fit the award criteria. Research shows we can think ourselves old or young.
A big soft hug device for people with advanced dementia
It looks like a long-limbed monkey doll, but a therapeutic device newly released by Cardiff Metropolitan University improves the wellbeing of people with advanced dementia
How the kindness of an older man helped a lonely, abused boy.
Although he's loved by many as an actor and entertainer, there was little love or respect in Billy Connolly's childhood. In his new book he describes one of the best things that happened to him was when an elderly man gave him a 'bob-a-job' along with respect and a listening ear.
When your hairdresser is the best medicine
Hairdresser says thank you to her older customers for their loyalty, and to encourage them as they come out of lock-down. She organises a fish and chip lunch and other retailers chip in to help, also.
The deadly ripple effect of the anti-vaxxers
Anti-vaxxers are entitled to their choices, but is it right that when they get Covid they put extra pressure on the NHS and people needing urgent treatment are denied it?
How can we encourage someone with dementia when they're in hospital?
Hospital can be discombobulating for any patient, but those living with dementia find it even more disconcerting. Dr Jennifer Bute, a senior GP who has been living with dementia for 14 years, shares on this Zoom from professional and personal experience. And Louise Morse describes the one thing that physiotherapists say is usually missing, that is vital to their good care.
Let's pray urgently for a righteous decision for our nation
This week the nation teeters on the brink of choosing to serve God or Mammon. Prime Minister Boris Johnson's plan for funding social care properly is to raise national insurance contributions or taxes. But he is opposed by Cabinet members who say it is morally wrong to raise taxes. Is it morally right to refuse help to thousands of disabled adults, or frail elderly? Are we serving Mammon or Grace?
God's original plan and the great times ahead
We are so used to living day by day, just coping and growing in faith that we rarely take time to wonder how life would look if the Serpent hadn't 'won' in the Garden of Eden. Here are some thoughts by one of the world's best Bible scholars.
Talk Beats Pills to Ease Dementia Ills
With no cure for dementia attention turns to prevention and things that can hold the symptoms back - Brain & Soul Boosting Sessions are doing just that!
A close friend and communications technology staves off dementia
New research shows that a friend who listens and using technology to stay in touch increases brain volume, improves cognition by '4-years worth', and staves off dementia.
Technology helped during lock-down but we missed the sense of touch
With scary news like this, no wonder people are fearful about Covid
Good news doesn't sell newspapers, which is why news about Covid is often presented in a scary way.
80 year olds who exercise have lower dementia risk than younger, inactive adults
The risk of getting dementia increases with age, but new data shows that 80 year-olds who exercise have less risk than younger, sedentary adults.
There's hope after man paralysed 18 years 'speaks' with brain implant.
After being paralysed and unable to speak for 18 years, with the aid of a brain implant 'Pancho's words' came up on a computer screen.
Celebrating Grandparents and the Elderly
Yesterday saw the Worlds First Day for Grandparents and the Elderly, instituted by Pope Francis. Every year, on the 4th Sunday in July, we will have the chance to especially celebrate them - and let them know how important they are to us and to our culture!
Stay cool as you chill this Summer
Things we can do to stay cool this summer
Baptist Union warns of the bereaved turning to spiritualism
Many of those suddenly bereaved by Covid during the pandemic weren't able to say their final goodbye and are turning to spiritualism to make contact with their loved ones.
Euthanasia, a daughter's letter to the editor
After campaigning to change the law on assisted dying, 'crusader' ends his life painlessly and peacefully.
Meaning in life - right to the end
Where voluntary euthanasia has been introduced, the scope has increased swiftly from those with terminal illnesses and only months to live, to young people with depression, disabled babies, and even those whose doctors decide that their quality of life warrants euthanasia. the UK Parliament has resisted changing our law three times, yet Baroness Meacher, chair of Dignity with Dying, is pushing again for change through the House of Lords.
‘Will I Still Be Me?' Christine Bryden asks in her latest book
The most important aspect of dementia care is helping to hold intact the identity of the person with dementia (Kitwood, 2010) As the disease progresses it can seem that the person has changed and is not recognisable as who he/she used to be. But changed behaviour does not mean that the person has disappeared.
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